The Church and Learning in Later Medieval Society

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Harlaxton Medieval Studies XI (New Series)

Proceedings of the 1999 Harlaxton Symposium: The Church and Learning in Later Medieval Society: Essays in Honour of R.B. Dobson, ed. Caroline M. Barron and Jenny Stratford

                                          

Articles:

Benjamin Thompson, The Academic and Active Vocations in the Medieval Church: Archbishop John Pecham, 1–24

James G. Clark, Monastic Education in Late Medieval England, 25–40

David Crook, Churches and Chapels on a Fifteenth-Century Monastic Map of the Lincolnshire Fenland, 41–50

A. J. Piper, The Monks of Durham and Patterns of Activity in Old Age, 51–63

Martin Heale, Books and Learning in the Dependent Priories of the Monasteries of Medieval England, 64–79

Lynda Dennison & Nicholas Rogers, A Medieval Best-Seller: Some Examples of Decorated Copies of Higden’s Polychronicon, 80–99

Andrew R. Wines, The University of Life and the London Charter-house: Practical Experience versus Scholarly Attainment within the Carthusian Leadership, 100–109

Pamela Tudor-Craig, The Iconography of Wisdom and the Frontispiece to the Bible Historiale, British Library, Additional Manuscript 18856, 110–127

Nicholas Vincent, Master Elias of Dereham (d. 1245): A Reassessment, 128–159

Compton Reeves, Creative Scholarship in the Cathedrals, 1300–1500, 160–169

Joan Greatrex, Horoscopes and Healing at Norwich Cathedral Priory in the Later Middle Ages, 170–177

David Lepine, ‘A Long Way from University’: Cathedral Canons and Learning at Hereford in the Fifteenth Century, 178–195

Pamela M. King, The Treasurer’s Cadaver in York Minster Reconsidered, 196–209

Patrick Zutshi, The Mendicant Orders and the University of Cambridge in the Fourteenth and Early Fifteenth Centuries, 210–227

John Barron, The Augustinian Canons and the University of Oxford: the Lost College of St George, 228–254

Virginia Davis, The Contribution of University-Educated Secular Clerics to the Pastoral Life of the English Church, 255–272

Jeffrey H. Denton, The Competence of the Parish Clergy in Thirteenth-Century England, 273–285

Clive Burgess, Educated Parishioners in London and Bristol on the Eve of the Reformation, 286–304

Fiona Kisby, Books in London Parish Churches before 1603: Some Preliminary Observations, 305–326

Joel T. Rosenthal, Clerical Book Bequests: a Vade Mecum, but Whence and Whither?, 327–343

Claire Cross, York Clergy and Their Books in the Early Sixteenth Century, 344–354

Alexandra F. Johnston, The York Cycle and the Libraries of York, 355–370

Carole Rawcliffe, The Eighth Comfortable Work: Education and the Medieval English Hospital, 371–398