Prophecy, Apocalypse and the Day of Doom

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Harlaxton Medieval Studies XII (New Series)

Proceedings of the 2000 Harlaxton Symposium: Prophecy, Apocalypse and the Day of Doom, ed. Nigel Morgan

                                                             

Articles:

Michael J. Bennett, Prophecy, Providence and the Revolution of 1399, 1–18

Hilary Carey, Astrology and the Last Things, 19–38

Lesley Coote, The Crusading Bishop: Henry Despenser and his Manuscript, 39–51

Martha Driver, Picturing the Apocalypse in the Printed Book of Hours, 52–67

Robert Easting, Personal Apocalypse: Judgement in Some Other-World Visions, 68–85

Rosalind Field, Apocalyptic Consolation in the Middle-English Pearl, 86–96

Richard Foster, The Perfect Three: A Numerological Context for the Calculation of the Lifespan of the Universe According to the Westminster Abbey Sanctuary Pavement, 97–117

Anke Holdenried, Aspects of the English Reception of the Sibylla Tiburtina: Prophecy and Devotion, 118–138

Steven Justice, Prophecy and the Explanation of Social Disorder, 139–159

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, Magda Hayton and Kenna Olsen Pseudo-Hildegardian, Prophecy and Antimendicant Propaganda in Late-Medieval England: An Edition of the Most Popular Insular Text of ‘Insurgent gentes’, 160–194

John Lowden, The Apocalypse in the Early-Thirteenth- Century Bibles Moralisées: A Re-Assessment, 195–219

Margaret Manion, The Angers Tapestries of the Apocalypse and Valois Patronage, 220-238

M. A. Michael, Matthew Paris, Brother William and St. Marcella: Comments on the Apocalyptic Man in British Library MS Cotton Nero.D.1, 239-249

Nigel Morgan, The Torments of the Damned in Hell in Texts and Images in England in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries, 250-260

Rosemary Muir Wright, Living in the Final Countdown: the Angevin Apocalypse Panels in Stuttgart, 261-276

Veronica O’Mara, ‘Go le curselynges, to euerelasting fier’: Doomsday in Middle English Prose Sermons, 277-291

Sue Powell, All Saints’ Church, North Street, York: Text and Image in the Pricke of Conscience Window, 292-316

Andrew Prescott, ‘The Hand of God’: the Suppression of the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381, 317-341

Nicholas Rogers, ‘Et expecto resurrectionem mortuorum’: Images and Texts Relating to the Resurrection of the Dead and the Last Judgement on English Brasses and Incised Slabs, 342-355

Pamela Tudor-Craig, Wells Cathedral West Front and the City of God, 356-376

Meg Twycross and Pamela King, Doomsday as Hypertext: Contexts of Doomsday in Fifteenth-Century Northern Manuscripts, 377-403